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DJ Cooper Building Conservation for Ledbury, Herefordshire

At the centre of Ledbury is the Black and White Grade 1 listed Market Hall. Reportedly designed by the King’s Carpenter John Abel, who was responsible not only for this, but for many other historical buildings that still stand in Herefordshire today. Building work on Market Hall started in 1617 and took around 50 years. This was obviously a good investment in time as the Market Hall is one of the finest examples in England and still hosts markets on Tuesdays and Saturdays. How many buildings made today will give a return of 100 years use for every ten used in their construction?<br /><br />Poets flock to Ledbury to soak up the heritage of Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and John Masefield, both of whom lived in the area. Each year, Ledbury hosts a poetry festival, which has become the leading event of its kind in the UK.<br /><br />Ledbury High Street has many black and white timbered buildings going back to a similar era to the Market Hall. Ledbury Town Hall features a famous 16th century painted room, while not far away, the Butcher Row House Museum offers a fascinating glimpse into local Victorian life.<br /><br />Just out of town, in the foothills of the Malverns is Eastnor Castle. Surrounded by a beautiful deer park, arboretum and lake, Eastnor is a 19th Century revival castle with richly decorated interiors and magnificent grounds.<br /><br />With historic buildings in and around the town, some national monuments, some still in use, owned privately or by the local council, we often find ourselves called on in the Ledbury area to ensure that when the grime from traffic, bird fouling, general day to day soiling or even graffiti is removed from a treasured building, there is no damage to the often delicate stonework beneath.<br /><br />From removal of old paint for a domestic redecoration project, or the intricate cleaning of stone work in a cathedral using the poultice method, you will find that wherever you are in Ledbury or Herefordshire, you will get a quick response, highly competitive quotation and thorough cleaning from DJ Cooper. Our number is shown above, or if you prefer to send us an email, simply click in the header of any page.

Photo from Featured Project near Ledbury, Herefordshire
Sandblasting

<p> Abrasive blasting, commonly referred to as 'Sandblasting', is the operation of forcibly propelling a stream of abrasive material against a surface under high pressure to smooth a rough surface, roughen a smooth surface, shape a surface, or remove surface contaminants.<br /><br />Despite the common use of the term, it is illegal in the UK to use most forms of sand for abrasive blasting, as the fine dust particles which are created when the sand is projected at high speed, can cause silicosis – a potentially fatal lung disease.<br /><br />With a wide choice of abrasive media available, the process can be fine tuned to suit the contamination to be removed and the surface from which it is to be cleaned. By choosing correctly and applying the process skilfully, excellent results can be achieved on a great variety of cleaning tasks.<br /><br />There are several variants of the process, using various media; some are highly abrasive, whereas others are milder. The most abrasive are shot blasting (with metal shot) and sandblasting (with sand). Moderately abrasive variants include glass bead blasting (with glass beads) and plastic media blasting (PMB) with ground-up plastic stock or walnut shells and corncobs. Some of these substances can cause anaphylactic shock to both operators and passers by.[2] A mild version is sodablasting (with baking soda). In addition, there are alternatives that are barely abrasive or nonabrasive, such as ice blasting and dry-ice blasting. </p><h4></h4><p></p><p></p>
Building Conservation, including Cleaning of: Services Provided in:
  • Masonry, Brickwork & Concrete
  • Wood (Beams & Patios)
  • Ferrous Metal & Some Non-Ferrous Metals
  • To remove:
  • Graffiti - promptly and carefully
  • Smoke damage
  • Paint
  • Bird droppings
  • Air pollution residues
  • Organic matter (slime and moss)
  • Grease
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